2015 SPRING GRADUATE COURSES

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TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Section 001
TOWARD AN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF BLACK WOMEN
Call Number 17347
T  2:10-4:00
Instructor: Farah J. Griffin
Points 4
Location: 758 Schermerhorn Ext
Notes: Graduate Students & Junior/Senior Undergraduates
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course will explore the lives and works of several twentieth century Black women intellectuals including, but not limited to Isa B. Wells, Zora Neale Hurston, Eslanda Goode Robeson, and Toni Morrison. We will also read secondary works that seek to construct an intellectual history of Black women. These will introduce us to the cross-disciplinary methodologies scholars use to investigate our subjects' contribution to Black thought 
 

 
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Section 002
ROMARE BEARDEN: HOME IS HARLEM
Call Number 26397
R   11:00 -12:50
Instructor:  Diedra Harris-Kelley
Points 4
Location: 758 Schermerhorn Ext
Notes: Graduate Students & Junior/Senior Undergraduates
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course, Romare Bearden: Home is Harlem, is an exploration into one of the greatest American artists finding home in Harlem. Romare Bearden (1911-1988) noted painter, collagist, intellectual and advocate for the arts, spent his childhood and young adult life in Harlem. Known for chronicling the African-American experience, he found rich sources in the Manhattan neighborhoods above 110th Street. Part of the great migration, Bearden’s family left Charlotte, NC when he was 3 years old, an abrupt departure that inspired a life long desire to create home, and to celebrate the soul of a community.  The Odyssey, one of Bearden’s most well known series (and the subject of a current exhibition at the Wallach Gallery), was created in 1977 and inspired by Homer’s Odyssey. Like the ancient epic poem, it is essentially about the artist's own search, and everyman's search for home. This course takes up the issues in The Black Odyssey exhibition, and beyond, examining Harlem as home through Bearden’s eyes, from an artistic perspective, and around what inspired him most –the history, the people, and jazz music. Presented by Diedra Harris-Kelley, a director of the Romare Bearden Foundation, lecturer, artist and niece of Bearden.  The course will take participants through Bearden's youth in Harlem, his involvement with Harlem institutions and intellectuals. And lead students through close readings of significant works of art.
 

 
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Section 003
RELIGION & CULTURE IN POST-CIVIL RIGHTS ERA BLACK AMERICA
Call Number 73322
M  11:00am - 12:50pm
Instructor: Josef Sorett
Points 4
Notes: Graduate Students & Junior/Senior Undergraduates ONLY
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This seminar on African American religion is open to graduate students, and advanced undergraduates with prior background in the subject.  Specifically, this course centers its queries around developments during the period commonly referred to as the “post-Civil Rights era,” (but which has also often been framed through the related rhetorics of “postmodern,” “postcolonial” and “post-Soul”).  To this end, readings and discussions will explore the spiritual dimensions of black culture—both within formal religious traditions, but also more broadly as they are observed in the arts, politics and popular culture—during the latter half of the twentieth century.  Additionally, specific attention will be paid to major themes, challenges, questions and quandaries that have shaped the inter-disciplinary study of African American religion in recent years.  Finally, taking a cue from critical race theory, questions of agency, power and difference will be foregrounded, as witnessed in how religious discourses and practices negotiate such categories as race, class, gender and sexuality.
 

 
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Section 004
QUISQUEYA - DIVIDED ISLAND
Call Number 97297
R  4:10pm – 6:00pm
Instructor: Steven Gregory
Points  4
Notes: Graduate Students & Junior/Senior Undergraduates

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Quisqueya-The Divided Island: Power, Culture and Nationalism in Haiti and the Dominican Republic Although they share the same island, the Republic of Haiti and the Dominican Republic have experienced distinct and divergent colonial and postcolonial histories, processes of nation building, and political and economic relationships to the wider world system.  In this seminar we will compare and contrast these two Caribbean societies as a means of identifying and analyzing critical historical and contemporary forces that have shaped their cultures and political economies.  This critical, comparative approach will help us to conceptualize not only similarities and differences between these two nations, but also the array of forces that have shaped the wider circum-Caribbean region.  Topics that we will investigate this semester include: colonization and plantation slavery; struggles for independence and sovereignty; U.S. occupation and dictatorship; music, religion and popular culture; and, globalization and transnational communities.
 

 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES W4038: Section 001
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY & RACE
Call Number 17349
M  2:10pm – 4:00pm
Instructor: Robert Gooding-Williams
Points  4
Level: Graduate
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
The seminar will explore some recent treatments of race, racial oppression, and racial politics by political philosophers and political theorists. Our readings will reflect a variety of theoretical traditions (e.g., pragmatism, genealogy, phenomenology, hermeneutics and Anglo-American analytical philosophy) and include the writings of Alia Al-Saji, Elizabeth Anderson, Cristina Beltrán, Robert Gooding-Williams, Sally Haslanger, Ladelle McWhorter, Tommie Shelby, Shannon Sullivan, Charles Taylor, and George Yancy.   A seminar presentation (10% of final grade), regular class participation (10% of final grade), and one, 20-25 page term paper (80% of final grade), due on May 11
 

 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES G4993: Section 002
EDITORIAL & WRITING COLLOQUIUM
Call Number  84280
W  4:10pm – 6:00pm
Instructor:  Rich Blint
Points 2
Location:  758 Schermerhorn Ext
Level: [African American Studies Graduate Students Only- Required Course]
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This colloquium is designed to guide students through the various stages of writing and editing the Master's thesis: defining the field of research, formulating the problem, choosing an appropriate research methodology, gathering information, organizing the material, revising, developing a bibliography, and preparing a scholarly manuscript. In addition to weekly peer-editing sessions, students will read, evaluate, and discuss essays from major writers in the field as a way to identify the generic conventions of fine critical analysis. 
 

 
COURSE: TBD
Instructor:  Obery Hendricks
Time: TBD 
Location:  758 Schermerhorn Ext
Open to Graduate Students; limited number of Upper Level undergraduate