2016 SPRING GRADUATE COURSES

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AFAS G4080 section 001 Call #: 61347
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: READING BLACK GIRLS
Instructor: Farah Jasmine Griffin
 
This seminar coincides with Black Girl Movement:  A National Conference, which will be held at Columbia University on April 7-April 9, 2015.   We will read an interdisciplinary selection of scholarly and creative texts that center the experience of Black girls in the United States.   In addition to reading and class discussion, students will help to build a website that serves as a bibliographic resource for future study.  Students will also serve as volunteers, hosts and ambassadors for Conference participants.  Conference attendance is required.  The course will culminate in a final group project that assesses the current state of research and writing on black girls and suggests directions for future scholarship and policy initiatives.   
 
 


AFAS G4080 section 003 Call #: 67396
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: GOSPEL MUSIC IN MODERN AMERICA
Instructor: Josef Sorett
 
This course will track the evolution of religion and music in African American history across the twentieth century to the present day. Beginning with the emergence of the Gospel-Blues during the 1920s, we will explore the ways in cultural aesthetics, religious imaginings and institutional formations have come together to shape the development of black musical forms, sacred and secular alike, across the evolving genres of blues, jazz, r&b, hip hop, neo-soul and more. 
 
 


AFAS G4080 section 004 Call #: 72798
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Race & Unmaking of the America City
Instructor: Steven Gregory
 
This seminar examines the role that race and other socially defined differences have played, and continue to play in the economic development, spatial organization and symbolic construction of American cities. We will situate contemporary discussion and debates concerning urban “gentrification,” associated with deindustrialization and neo-liberal economic policies, within the longue durée of race-based spatial, occupational and symbolic exclusion and consider how these dividing practices have shaped the production of both popular culture and academic knowledge relating to U.S. cities, their problems, and populations. Finally, we will examine how African Americans and other racialized groups have resisted these exclusions, producing alternative and oppositional forms of cultural expression, socioeconomic organization and urban knowledge.
 
 


AFAS G4080 section 005 Call #: 78048
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: African-American Politics in the Era of Obama and Black Lives Matter
Instructor: Keith Boykin
 
This seminar will explore the meaning and significance of African-American politics at a time when the nation has a black president, nearly four dozen members of the Congressional Black Caucus and a burgeoning new black social justice movement. Students will examine the influence and limits of electoral politics and its synergy with grassroots activism in a country where African Americans make up only 13 percent of the population. We'll also analyze the role of black Republicans, black conservatism and respectability politics. Finally, students will develop proposals for sustainable African American political movements that transcend the current occupant of the White House.
 
 


AFAS G4993 section 001 Call #: 81796
EDITORIAL & WRITING COLLOQ I: EDITORIAL & WRITING COLLOQUIUM
COLLOQUIA
African-American Studies MA required course