IRAAS STUDENT PORTAL

Denise Acron is currently a Public Benefits Staff Attorney for Manhattan Legal Services. In her role, she represents low income clients and litigates cases dealing with public assistance, food stamps, Medicare, and Medicaid. She serves on the New York City Bar Public Service Committee and also on the New York County Lawyers' Association's Minorities and the Law Committee. She received her undergraduate degree from Columbia University, graduating in 2011, cum...

CLASS OF 2011
African American Studies-Literature

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UNDERGRADUATE: African-American Studies is an interdisciplinary curriculum that examines the experiences of people of the African Diaspora -- sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, the United States and Canada and Europe...READ MORE >>
  
GRADUATE: Our Master of Arts Program is designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in the literature and research of African-American Studies, and enable them to produce critical analysis and research about the complex and historically...READ MORE >>

Featured Faculty

Frank A. Guridy Frank A. Guridy specializes in sport history, urban history, and the history of the African Diaspora in the Americas. He is the author of Forging Diaspora: Afro-Cubans and African Americans in a World of Empire and Jim Crow (University of North Carolina Press, 2010), which won the Elsa Goveia Book...

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Featured Faculty Book

South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s In South of Pico Kellie Jones explores how the artists in Los Angeles's black communities during the 1960s and 1970s created a vibrant, productive, and engaged activist arts scene in the face of structural racism. Emphasizing the importance of African American migration, as well as L.A.'s housing and employment politics, Jones shows how the work of black Angeleno artists such as Betye Saar, Charles White, Noah Purifoy, and Senga Nengudi spoke to the dislocation of migration, L.A.'s urban renewal, and restrictions on black mobility. Jones characterizes their works as modern migration narratives that look to the...

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Prof. Frank Guridy leads tour & conference re: At Columbia, Revisiting the Revolutionary Students of 1968

March 22, 2018

The campus of Columbia University is dotted with monuments to illustrious alumni and high-minded ideals. But on a sunny afternoon earlier this week, about two dozen people gathered around the sundial in its central plaza to pay tribute to a momentous event that has gone uncommemorated in stone.

“Horam expecta veniet — await the hour, it shall come,” Frank Guridy, an associate professor of history at the university, proclaimed, reading a Latin inscription on the sundial. “I think it’s sort of poetic that things began here.”

“Things” is an understatement for what began at Columbia around noon on April 23, 1968, when students, united by opposition to plans to build a university gym in a nearby public park and by Columbia’s involvement in weapons research, converged on that spot. A week later, nearly a thousand activists had occupied five buildings (including the president’s office), taken the dean hostage and shut down the campus, before being removed by the police in a violent melee that ended with one of the largest mass arrests in New York City history. READ MORE