2015 SPRING UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

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AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES W3034: Section 001
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND THE CARCERAL STATE IN THE 20th CENTURY UNITED STATES
Call Number:  97349
W  9:00am – 10:50am
Instructor:  Samuel K. Roberts
Points 4
Level: Undergraduate
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This course provides an introduction to historical and contemporary concepts and issues in the U.S. criminal justice system, including state violence; the evolution of modern policing; inequality and criminal justice policy; drug policy as urban policy; and the development of mass incarceration and the “carceral continuum.” The writing component to this course is a 20-25 page research paper on a topic to be developed in consultation with the instructor. This course has been approved for inclusion the African American Studies and History undergraduate curricula. To apply for course enrollment, please contact Prof. Samuel Roberts (skroberts@columbia.edu).
 

 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES  C3936:  Section 001
BLACK INTELLECTUALS
Call Number  12781
W  11:00am – 12:50pm
Instructor:  Zinga Fraser
Points  4
Location:  758 Schermerhorn Ext
Level: Undergraduate
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
This undergraduate seminar provides a cross-disciplinary examination of the contributions and dilemmas of Black intellectuals.  As thought producers and critics of their time, black intellectuals create ideologies and political discourses that resist racial and gender oppressions, colonialism and labor exploitation. In addition to exploring the writings of men and women who contribute to what scholars identify as the black intellectual tradition we will pay significant attention to the ways in which black artists (in literature, poetry, music and the visual arts) use radical ideas in their work to not only combat racial injustice but also develop a radical politics. This seminar is designed to explore the approaches, conditions, and methods through which certain black intellectuals began to self-consciously construct an identity and represent themselves as intellectuals around the globe. We will also engage recent debates on the role of black intellectuals in the 21st century.
 

 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES C3930: Section 001
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE
CULTURE OF FREEDOM: QUILOMBOS, PALENQUES & MAROON SOCITIES IN THE AMERICAS & BEYOND.
Call Number  94694
Tuesday:  4:10pm – 6:00pm
Instructor:  C.D.  Dawson
Points  4
Location:  758 Schermerhorn Ext
Level: Undergraduate
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Africans in the Americas had various ways of resisting slavery and oppression including work slowdowns, breaking of tools, destruction of crops and property, revolt and escape from captivity. This course, Maroons in the Americas…, will discuss the important societies formed by self-liberated Africans including quilombos and mocambos in Brazil, palenques and cumbes in the Spanish speaking Americas, and maroon societies in the United States, South America and the Caribbean. It will also cover the little known siddi community of Northern Karnataka, India established by Africans fleeing enslavement in Goa.  In addition to creating the first non-indigenous republics in the Americas, maroons gave us pioneering ideas about social responsibility and individual rights, concepts that are still operative in our social philosophy. Revolts and runaways also gave the Americas some exceptional leaders who are still celebrated, including Captain Sebastián Lemba in the Dominican Republic, Yanga in Mexico, King Zumbi in Brazil, King Benkos Bioho in Columbia, King Bayano in Panama, Queen Grandy Nanny and Captain Kojo in Jamaica, King Miguel Guacamaya in Venezuela, Makandal and Boukman in Haiti, and, although not as well known as the others, John Horse (aka Juan Caballo or Gopher John) in the United States and Mexico. Furthermore, we will investigate the numerous quilombos, palenques and maroon societies that still exist, as well as how their ubiquitous ideas are represented in all spheres of society from the arts to cyberspace. Guest speakers include: noted Colombian photographer Oscar Frasser; Washington University historian, Yuko Miki; and University of Texas-Austin linguist Ian Hancock.
 

 
AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES C3930: Section 002
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE
RACE, SCHOOLS & POLICY
Call Number  77532
Tuesday:  11:00am – 12:50pm
Instructor:  R.L. Lewis-McCoy
Points   4
Location:  758 Schermerhorn Ext
Level: Undergraduate
 
COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Schools are thought by many to be "the great equalizers." In this course, the potential of schools as sites of equity will be explored through the lens of race, class, gender and power. The course will focus on the history and contemporary nature of educational inequality and query which policies can abate these observed differences.
 
From Syllabus:
This course is designed to introduce and deepen students understanding of the ways that race has been a factor in the institution of schools in the United States. The course intends to enhance students’ understanding of theoretical perspectives, policy issues, and social scientific evidences’ role in the policy process. We will examine varying issues facing the institution of schools with a focus on African-Americans and other populations of color. Using sociological analysis we will interrogate past and present policy levers that affect(ed) schooling for all children. From this class, students will gain a richer knowledge base for understanding current policy debates and conduct better analysis of problems facing schools in the contemporary United States. This course will be reading, writing, and discussion intensive.