2016 SPRING UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

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AFAS C3930 section 001 ; Call #17797
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: Culture of Freedom: Quilombos, Palenques & Maroon Societies in the Americas and Beyond
Instructor: C. Daniel Dawson
 
Topics in the Black Experience: Culture of Freedom: Quilombos, Palenques & Maroon Societies in the Americas and Beyond. Africans in the Americas had various ways of resisting slavery and oppression including work slowdowns, breaking of tools, destruction of crops and property, revolt and escape from captivity. This course, Maroons in the Americas…, will discuss the important societies formed by self-liberated Africans including quilombos and mocambos in Brazil, palenques and cumbes in the Spanish speaking Americas, and maroon societies in the United States, South America and the Caribbean. It will also cover the little known siddi community of Northern Karnataka, India established by Africans fleeing enslavement in Goa.  In addition to creating the first non-indigenous republics in the Americas, maroons gave us pioneering ideas about social responsibility and individual rights, concepts that are still operative in our social philosophy. Revolts and runaways also gave the Americas some exceptional leaders who are still celebrated, including Captain Sebastián Lemba in the Dominican Republic, Yanga in Mexico, King Zumbi in Brazil, King Benkos Bioho in Columbia, King Bayano in Panama, Queen Grandy Nanny and Captain Kojo in Jamaica, King Miguel Guacamaya in Venezuela, Makandal and Boukman in Haiti, and, although not as well known as the others, John Horse (aka Juan Caballo or Gopher John) in the United States and Mexico. Furthermore, we will investigate the numerous quilombos, palenques and maroon societies that still exist, as well as how their ubiquitous ideas are represented in all spheres of society from the arts to cyberspace. Africans in the Americas had various ways of resisting slavery and oppression including work slowdowns, breaking of tools, destruction of crops and property, revolt and escape from captivity. This course, Maroons in the Americas..., will discuss the important societies formed by self-liberated Africans including quilombos and mocambos in Brazil, palenques and cumbes in the Spanish speaking Americas, and maroon societies in the United States, South America and the Caribbean. It will also cover the little known siddi community of Northern Karnataka, India established by Africans fleeing enslavement in Goa. In addition to creating the first non-indigenous republics in the Americas, maroons gave us pioneering ideas about social responsibility and individual rights, concepts that are still operative in our social philosophy. Revolts and runaways also gave the Americas some
 
 


AFAS C3930 section 002;  Call #21196
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: #sayhername -AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S HISTORY
Instructor: Prudence Cumberbatch
 
#sayhername:African American Women’s History  ___Recognizing the intersectionality of the African American women’s experience is paramount to contextualize both interracial and intraracial dialogues about race and gender in the United States. In searching for political freedom and economic opportunity, African American women have historically challenged race and gender norms in order to secure justice for themselves and their communities. The contemporary call to “sayhername” has historical antecedents, as generations of African American women worked to rewrite the Black American narrative to construct independent identities as race women, and thereby position themselves as race leaders. By linking the past to the present, the goal of this course is to explore the role of African American Women as change agents by situating their narratives at the center of the American experience.
 
 


AFAS C3930 section 003 Call #: 15797
TOPICS IN THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: ROMARE BEARDEN: HOME IS HARLEM
Instructor: Deidra Harris-Kelley
This course, Romare Bearden: Home is Harlem, is an exploration into one of the greatest American artists finding home in Harlem. Romare Bearden (1911-1988) noted painter, collagist, intellectual and advocate for the arts, spent his childhood and young adult life in Harlem. Known for chronicling the African-American experience, he found rich sources in the Manhattan neighborhoods above 110th Street.  Part of the great migration, Bearden’s family left Charlotte, NC when he was 3 years old, an abrupt departure that inspired a life long desire to create home, and to celebrate the soul of a community.  The Odyssey, one of Bearden’s most well known series, was created in 1977 and inspired by Homer’s Odyssey. Like the ancient epic poem, it is essentially about the artist's own search, and everyman's search for home. This course takes up the issues in The Black Odyssey exhibition, and beyond, examining Harlem as home through Bearden’s eyes, from an artistic perspective, and around what inspired him most –the history, the people, and jazz music.
 
 


AFAS C3936 section 001 Call #: 62901
SEMINAR: BLACK INTELLECTUALS
Instructor: Frank Guridy
 
This undergraduate seminar examines a diverse group of black intellectuals' formulations of ideologies and theories relative to racial, economic and gender oppression within the context of dominant intellectual trends. The intellectuals featured in the course each contributed to the evolution of black political thought, and posited social criticisms designed to undermine racial and gender oppression, and labor exploitation around the world. This group of black intellectuals' work will be analyzed, paying close attention to the way that each intellectual inverts dominant intellectual trends, and/or uses emerging social scientific disciplines to counter racism, sexism, and classism. This seminar is designed to facilitate an understanding of the black intellectual tradition that has emerged as a result of African-American thinkers' attempts to develop a unified response to an understanding of the black condition. This course explores of a wide range of primary and secondary sources from several different periods, offering students opportunity to explore the lives and works of some of the most important black intellectuals. We will also consider the way that period-specific intellectual phenomenon-such as Modernism, Marxism, Pan-Africanism, and Feminism-combined with a host of social realities.
 
 


AFAS W4035 section 001 Call #: 28347
CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND THE CARCERAL STATE IN THE 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES
Instructor: Samuel K. Roberts Jr.
 
This course provides an introduction to historical and contemporary concepts and issues in the U.S. criminal justice system, including state violence; the evolution of modern policing; inequality and criminal justice policy; drug policy as urban policy; and the development of mass incarceration and the “carceral continuum.” The writing component to this course is a 20-25 page research paper on a topic to be developed in consultation with the instructor. This course has been approved for inclusion in the African-American Studies and History undergraduate curricula.
 
 


AFAS W4039 section 001 Call #: 77697
AFRO-LATIN AMERICA
Instructor: Frank Guridy
 
This undergraduate seminar course examines the historical experiences of people of African descent in Latin America and the Caribbean (often called “Afro-Latin America”). The guiding questions of this course are: What is Afro-Latin America? Where is it? How can we write the histories of African descended peoples in the region we call “Latin America”? Can the histories of Africans and their descendants be contained within the confines of “nation”? Are there alternative frameworks (transnational and/or Diasporic) that can better enhance our understanding of these histories? While the course will begin in the slavery era, most of our attention will focus on the histories of Afro-Latin Americans after emancipation. Topics we will explore include: the particularities of slavery in the Americas, the Haitian Revolution and its impact on articulations of race and nation in the region, debates on “racial democracy,” the relationship between gender race, and empire, and recent attempts to write Afro-Latin American histories from “transnational” and “diaspora” perspectives. While historians have written most of the work we will read in this course, we will also engage the works of anthropologists and sociologists who have also been key contributors to this scholarship. Thus, the course has a three-fold objective: 1) To deepen our understanding of the diverse histories of Africans and their descendants in the region. 2) To continually probe the ongoing tension between national and transnational processes that is embedded in much of this scholarship. 3) To explore alternative frameworks that might enhance our understanding of the histories of people of African descent in the region.